Minneapolis erupts in violence, vandalism for second straight night after black man's death in police custody, 1 person killed

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Violence rocks Minneapolis for second straight night after black man's death in police custody, 1 person killed
A man was shot to death as violent protests erupted in Minneapolis for a second straight night Wednesday over the death of a black man while in police custody.

Multiple reports indicated that Mayor Jacob Frey reached out to Gov. Tim Walz to deploy the National Guard to the city. The mayor’s office did not immediately respond to Fox News seeking comment.

At least one group of armed men was seen outside a strip mall amid intensifying protests and looting in the city. Police on Wednesday responded to reports of a stabbing victim near the protests and discovered a man had been shot. The man later died, police said, and a suspect has been taken into custody. A reporter for the Star Tribune tweeted that police were "working through the ‘theory’ of this homicide being related to a report of a Minneapolis pawnshop owner shooting a looter."

The two nights of protests were sparked by the death of George Floyd, who died Monday night while in police custody. A citizen's cell phone video later emerged showing Floyd on the ground with a police officer’s knee pressed against his neck for approximately eight minutes. Officers had responded to a call from a grocery store that Floyd had allegedly tried to use a forged check to make purchases.

That officer and three others were fired Tuesday. On Wednesday, Mayor Jacob Frey called for the officer who pressed his knee against Floyd's neck to be criminally charged. At the request of President Trump, federal investigators have joined the investigation into Floyd's death.

Protesters damage properties at the Minneapolis 3rd Police Precinct in Minneapolis on Wednesday, May 27, 2020. The mayor of Minneapolis called Wednesday for criminal charges against the white police officer seen on video kneeling against the neck of a handcuffed black man who complained that he could not breathe and died in police custody. (Carlos Gonzalez/Star Tribune via AP)

Protesters damage properties at the Minneapolis 3rd Police Precinct in Minneapolis on Wednesday, May 27, 2020. The mayor of Minneapolis called Wednesday for criminal charges against the white police officer seen on video kneeling against the neck of a handcuffed black man who complained that he could not breathe and died in police custody. (Carlos Gonzalez/Star Tribune via AP)

Protesters also gathered Wednesday evening at the officer's suburban home as well as the Minneapolis home of Mike Freeman, the Hennepin County prosecutor who would make the decision on charges in the case. No violence was reported in those protests. Click here for more on our top story.

Other related developments:
- Los Angeles protests erupt over Floyd death
- Activists compare Floyd video to Eric Garner 'I can't breathe' case
- Lawrence Jones urges Minneapolis protesters to 'let the system do its job'
- 'Star Wars' actor John Boyega slams 'racist white people’ in reaction to George Floyd death

Twitter's Jack Dorsey fires back at Zuckerberg, defends fact-checking Trump tweets
Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey fired back at Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who criticized the tech giant's decision to fact-check President Trump's tweets about mail-in voting.

On Tuesday, Twitter slapped a warning label on one of Trump's tweets for the first time, cautioning readers that despite the president's claims, "fact checkers" say there is "no evidence" that expanded, nationwide mail-in voting would increase fraud risks -- and that "experts say mail-in ballots are very rarely linked to voter fraud." Within minutes, Trump accused Twitter of stifling free speech and "interfering in the 2020 Presidential Election ... based on fact-checking by Fake News CNN and the Amazon Washington Post."

In a preview clip of his interview with Fox News' Dana Perino, Zuckerberg weighed in on the escalating dustup between Trump and Twitter.

TUNE IN TODAY: Don't miss Dana Perino's full interview with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on "The Daily Briefing" at 2 p.m. ET

"We have a different policy than, I think, Twitter on this," Zuckerberg told "The Daily Briefing" in an interview scheduled to air in its entirety on Thursday. "I just believe strongly that Facebook shouldn't be the arbiter of truth of everything that people say online," he added. "Private companies probably shouldn't be, especially these platform companies, shouldn't be in the position of doing that."

In a late-night Twitter thread, Dorsey refuted Zuckerberg's comments while defending Twitter's "Head of Site Integrity" Yoel Roth. Anti-Trump tweets by Roth were discovered in the wake of the politically charged debate over the president's tweets.

"Fact check: there is someone ultimately accountable for our actions as a company, and that’s me," Dorsey began. "Please leave our employees out of this. We’ll continue to point out incorrect or disputed information about elections globally. And we will admit to and own any mistakes we make." Click here for more.

Other related developments:
- White House says Trump will sign an executive order on social media

Barr asks US attorney to review 'unmasking' before and after 2016 election, DOJ tells Fox News
Attorney General William Barr has asked John Bash, the U.S. attorney for the Western District of Texas, to review the practice of "unmasking" before and after the 2016 presidential election, a controversy that has picked up steam after the Justice Department moved to drop charges against former national security adviser Michael Flynn, the DOJ told Fox News on Wednesday night.

Republican lawmakers have demanded more information about the extent of the practice after a previously clandestine list of Obama-era officials who sought to reveal what turned out to be the identity of Michael Flynn in intelligence reports was released earlier the month. The DOJ had moved to drop the Flynn case after internal memos were released, raising serious questions about the nature of the investigation that led to his late-2017 guilty plea for lying to the FBI about his Russia contacts. Click here for more.

Other related developments:
- Flynn's lawyer says Robert Mueller prosecuted her client to further Russian collusion hoax
- Sol Wisenberg says Flynn judge's move to hire attorney could indicate he's 'in trouble.'

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SOME PARTING WORDS

Tucker Carlson blasts Twitter's fact-check of President Trump as "a lie" and calls it "a form of political censorship."

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