Mitch McConnell on Barr criticism of Trump tweets: 'I think the president should listen to his advice'

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told "Special Report with Bret Baier" Thursday that if Attorney General William Barr believes the president's tweeting is getting in the way of Barr's work, Trump should follow the attorney general's cue.

"The president made a great choice when he picked Bill Barr to be the attorney general," McConnell told host Bret Baier. "I think the president should listen to his advice."

Barr told ABC News earlier in the day that Trump is being unhelpful when he tweets about cases like that of Republican political consultant Roger Stone -- in which the president objected to a stiff sentence recommended by the four prosecutors in the case, all of whom have since stepped down.

TRUMP RESPONDS TO BARR'S REMARKS DURING INTERVIEW

"I think that if the attorney general says [tweeting] is getting in the way of doing his job, then maybe the president should listen to the attorney general," McConnell repeated when questioned by Baier.

Following McConnell's interview, the White House responded to Barr's critique by saying he has the right to publicly offer his opinion on the president.

In a statement attributed to Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham, the White House said Trump has "full faith and confidence" in Barr to do his job and added that the president has used social media effectively to fight for the American people "against injustices in our country including the fake news."

Later in the interview, Baier asked McConnell whether he would go forward with the nomination of a Supreme Court justice before the November election. McConnell has been criticized for not holding a hearing for President Obama's 2016 nominee Merrick Garland, citing the fact it was an election year.

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McConnell told Baier that his comments at the time specified that it has been longstanding custom since the 1880s that no Senate controlled by the opposing party to the sitting president has gone forward with the nominating process.

In 1888, President Grover Cleveland, a Democrat, nominated Illinois Judge Melville Fuller to the bench before a Republican-majority Senate just prior to his unsuccessful reelection bid against former Sen. Benjamin Harrison, R-Ind.

The Senate confirmed Fuller 41-20.

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